SAVE THE DATES: Holidays in Ballard

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS in BALLARD

 

BALLARD GIVES BLACK – November 28th, 2014

Now in it’s second year, Ballard Gives Black Friday is an event conceived by local merchants in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle. The event occurs on the day after Thanksgiving but instead of long lines, doorbuster deals and crowded parking lots, Ballard retailers welcome shoppers to a different experience; keeping it local. Participating merchants pledge a percentage of the day’s business to a local non-profit as a way of encouraging community, letting shoppers know that more of their hard-earned shopping dollars stay in the community when you shop local.

SHOP SMALL THIS HOLIDAY SEASON – November 29th, 2014

Shop Small Saturday encourages people to shop at small businesses on the Saturday after Thanksgiving. The single day has grown into a powerful movement, and more people are taking part than ever before. Join the revolution, get out and Shop Small on November 29th and make an impact in your neighborhood.

OPEN LATE THURSDAYS -December 4, December 11, December 18

Many Ballard Shops are open late on Thursdays in December, including us! We’re actually open until 8pm Monday thru Saturday, for your shopping convenience. December is the perfect time to shop Ballard after dark with the streets are all lit up with twinkly lights.

For other Ballard neighborhood events, check out the Ballard Chamber or MyBallard.

Hope to see you this holiday season!

XO — team re-souL

Ballard Gives Black Friday: Skate Like A Girl

This year, re-souL will partner with Skate Like a Girl for Ballard Gives Black Friday and we are pledging a percentage of our sales for Friday November 28th to the organization.

We’re guessing very few readers know that re-souL co-owner Legh is a life-long skateboarder and 2 years ago founded the Ballard Thrashers Skateboard Club as a way to keep his son and all the friends together during the summer months. After 2 full summers of Saturday Skateboard Club, in 2014 Legh partnered with a local non-profit Skate Like a Girl to produce an after school skateboard team for kids.

This connection brought professional skateboarder Kristin Ebeling on as skate coach as well as a team of certified skateboard instructors to help the Ballard Thrashers take their skills to a whole new level. Kristin’s skate coaching philosophy focuses not only on tricks and skills, but values such as leadership, teamwork and sportsmanship.

We’d like to recognize them not only for their talent as an organization but also as individuals. We think they’re rad. So let us introduce you to Skate Like a Girl superstars Kristin Ebeling and Jasmin Kwan.

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Jasmin Kwan and Kristin Ebeling wearing boots and shoes from Kudeta.

Name: Kristin Ebeling (Seattle Chapter Director)
Sponsors: Evo, Meow Skateboards & The Skate Witches
Hometown: Atlanta, GA
Regular or Goofy: Goofy
Favorite Food: Anything (our friend) Marshall or my mom makes!
 
Name: Jasmin Kwan (Development Director)
Sponsors: Nancy Chang (our board chair) telling me I can do whatever I want.
Hometown: Kent, WA
Regular or Goofy: Goofy
Favorite Food: Tater tots or Indian buffet.

 

How long have you been skateboarding and how did you get started?

JK: I first started when I was about 15, but I was also a competitive gymnast – I had to lie about how I got hurt (while skating). And basically had to hide it, as if it were a sketchy boyfriend or something. So I pretty much took a hiatus from 16 to 23 years old.

KE: I started at age 12. I played football with the boys at recess, so naturally when they picked up skateboards, I did too. I was also inspired by Elissa Steamer’s character on the Tony Hawk’s pro skater video games. I thought, “if she’s skating, so can I.” I liked that she wasn’t too girly. I could relate to that.

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How did you get connected to the Skate Like a Girl organization?

JK: My first Skate Like a Girl clinic was in 2006 at the Sustainable Ballard Festival hosted at the Ballard Bowl. I remember Kristin teaching me how to do kick turns and pumping. But I wasn’t involved again until September of 2013, when I cold called the number online to say I was throwing a benefit concert. Nancy was skeptical, but eventually agreed to meet when she knew I was serious. The show raised $7k, which was a major funding push for the year. I was brought on in May as the ‘Development Director,’ so I quit my day job and devoted all of my energy towards evolving Skate Like a Girl. (Next benefit show is coming up! January 16th at the Vera Project!!)

KE: I “met” Skate Like a Girl when I was 17. I heard about an all girls skate competition they were throwing, so I decided to check it out. At that point I was an accomplished skater of 5 years, but hadn’t really skated with another gal before. My jaw dropped as I saw a girl ollie the 8 stair when I walked up. Beyond that, I was stoked to see a woman (Nancy Chang) on the microphone announcing, as well as other ladies filming and taking photos. I was so inspired by the energy, I decided I wanted to be a part of the crew immediately. From that point, I began volunteering at clinics and events. The rest is history!

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Can you tell us in your own words what Skate Like a Girl represents to you?

JK: Skate Like a Girl represents a revolution happening in skateboarding culture. We’re moving away from the male-dominated, ‘skate as wild as you can’ scene, and towards a more diverse demographic. We have moms wanting to learn how to skate because their kids are doing it – that pretty much speaks for itself. We are changing the stigmas that come with doing something ‘like a girl,’ and I love that.

KE: Skate Like a Girl represents the future of skateboarding. We are constantly pushing the “norms” of who can participate in skateboarding, and how people learn to skate.

Where do you think Skate Like a Girl is going? 5 years? 10 years?

JK: My utopian vision is to have our own covered skate space with a foam pit! Realistically though, capacity building in our existing chapters and expanding to different cities nationwide (or worldwide). I really believe that we are changing skateboarding culture in our communities and in the media – people will start to connect our mission with the changes they’re seeing in the coming years.

KE: Skate Like a Girl is going in whatever direction is needed from our local communities. We essentially build our programs based off of people saying, “hey this would be a good idea.” My personal hope is that we can open up our own all-weather skate facility and create a youth skateboarding league within the next 5 years. Within the next 10 years, I would hope we could expand to some new cities, while continuing to create gender equity within skateboarding. It would be great to be able to say that 50% of all skaters in Seattle are female. This would not only be rad to me personally, but would allow for tremendous growth for our local skate shops & other businesses.

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The girls striking a pose. Jasmin is wearing the re-souL “Buffy” and Krisitn is wearing the Coclico “Dore”

 

Name one or more of your favorite female skateboarders and what about them do you like:

JK: Sky, she’s now 6 years old. I like her because she TOTALLY RIPS! See for yourself: http://girlskateuk.com/2014/10/20/6-yr-old-sky-from-california-absolutely-rips/

KE: I’m going to have to go with Lacey Baker. She – hands down – has the best style, and is such a humble person as well. She also has a degree in graphic design and has done some rad work for Meow Skateboards. Oh yeah, she won x games this past summer.

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So, when you’re not skateboarding, tell us about a favorite outfit you like to rock, what’s your style?

JK: I’d say it’s pretty country Western Mad Max meets 70s glam with lazy punk rock boarder chick accents. My favorite ‘fancy’ outfit at the moment is my 70s blue/purple paisley shirt dress with grape colored Jeffrey Campbell Litas. Top that with a faux fur coat OR black motorcycle jacket to break the cold Seattle breeze. My hair also happens to be a random bright color at any given moment.

KE: I’ve been really into jumpers & floral print lately. I would describe my style as basically taking one feminine piece, like a jumper or dress, then throwing in a punk/skate inspired jacket, along with some badass boots or beat up converse. I also throw a little flare with a five panel hat, and some vintage inspired jewelry.

Pink or Orange?  

JK: My helmet is orange, but I am not afraid of some HOT pink.
KE: Orange, Go [Ballard] THRASHERS!

Shopping or Drinking?  

JK: Antique malls and craft beer.
KE: Thrift stores & dive bars.

Tony Hawk or Tony Alva?

JK: Da Hawk.
KE: Birdman all day!

Top 4 Reasons You Should Shop Small Saturday

Back in July we were musing about retail. Small retail. Independent retail. We’re gearing up for the holidays and it’s the perfect time to reach out to our re-souL community to remind you how important it is to support small businesses.

Back in 2010, American Express founded Small Business Saturday to help businesses with their most pressing need — getting more customers. The day encourages people to shop at small businesses on the Saturday after Thanksgiving. The single day has grown into a powerful movement, and more people are taking part than ever before. This year, the big day is Nov 29. Here are the top 4 reasons you should shop small.

SHOP SMALL

Local businesses often hire people who have a better understanding of the products they’re selling, and take more time to get to know their customers.

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SHOP SMALL

Independent businesses make purchases requiring less transportation and are usually located in commercial corridors and in-town instead of developing on the fringe. This means less sprawl, congestion, habitat loss and pollution.

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 SHOP SMALL

When you shop local, three times the revenue remains in your community, supporting parks, schools and more! For every $100 spent at a locally owned business, $45 goes back into the community and our tax base. For every $100 spent at a chain store, only $14 comes back.

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SHOP SMALL: LIVE LOCAL & GIVE LOCAL

Independent businesses are the largest contributors to LOCAL charities. Non-profit organizations receive an average of 250% more support from local business owners than they do from non-locally owned businesses.

Friday ~ Free Ballard: Curtis Steiner

Many of you know that our shop is located in a really great Seattle neighborhood known as Ballard.  In all its history and hoopla, Ballard is also our home and we’re dedicating Fridays to telling everyone why we love it here. 

Those of you who are local Seattlites, may already know of Curtis Steiner’s beautiful shop and gallery. So, please bear with us as we tell the world why Curtis Steiner is the crown jewel of our Ballard neighborhood. If you ever come to shop our little street, his gallery is a must stop on your next shopping adventure. It is a feast for the eyes and a truly a magical space.

From his beautiful hand drawn cards, to his carefully curated collection of turn of the century ephemera and his intricate and delicate designed jewelry it’s easy to get lost in this world upon entering the doors. At any given time you can visit Curtis Steiner and find something that you had not noticed before. Each little vignette is carefully arranged and always displayed flawlessly. Even the drawers of the back counter have little treasures to admire and explore.

Curtis also exhibits and rotates other local artists 5 to 6 times a year. Currently showing are “Paper Cuts” by Jessica McCourt. Beautiful gold paper is transformed into intricate maritime portraits with careful cuts. In November, for the 9th year in a row, Patty Grazini’s paper sculptures will return to the gallery. The show promises to be as exciting and inspiring as in years past.

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Curtis’s ability to discover beauty in the littlest of things and his attention to detail in everything he does is rare and inspiring. Just peruse his Instagram feed and his Pinterest boards and quickly understand why we admire his artistry. Even his pictures taken on his “walks with Mortimer” are ethereal. Curtis is an  artist of many, many talents and we are so fortunate to have him as an anchor in the neighborhood.

Curtis Steiner is located at 5349 Ballard Avenue NW – Seattle WA, 98107

Friday ~ Free Ballard: Todd Werny and Space Oddity

Many of you know that our shop is located in a really great Seattle neighborhood known as Ballard.  In all its history and hoopla, Ballard is also our home and we’re dedicating Fridays to telling everyone why we love it here. 

Today’s special little Ballard place is brought to you by Mr. Todd Werny by way of his tiny shop called Space Oddity.  It’s located “around the corner” from our shop and it’s underneath an art gallery, very easy to miss.  To say that the shop has an eclectic mix of items just wouldn’t do any justice to the place.  Todd is a collector of vintage things, ranging from the mid-century modern to rustic industrial and institutional.  Some things are perfect, some are hard worn.  He finds all sorts of unrelated items and brings them together, medical equipment, filing cabinets, laboratory elements, measuring devices.  Many of the items are repurposed, industrial racks as a storage solution, chemistry utensils as design elements in your home.  It’s not for everyone but for those with a keen eye, there’s some really great finds.

Space Oddity stocks items from another era, when things were built in America, by people with tools and machinery, in a simpler time.  The shop reminds us that production and manufacturing once occurred without the aid of robotics, automation and computer aided design.  A mechanical typewriter sits next to a device once used to measure Ph levels.  70’s era plastics are here and there, wooden school chairs and a hospital gurney.  And T-Shirts, designed by Todd with Ballard themes!

Space Oddity, entry

Todd himself comes from an era of punk rock and skateboarding.  Twenty years ago he started a motorcycle club that now has chapters all down the west coast.  Unrelated, he started Backfire Moto, a motor club specializing in cafe racer, vintage and rat bikes that meets up every month.

Space Oddity, menagerie

Locals know that anything at Space Oddity is likely one of a kind and the inventory turns regularly.  Regulars stop by once a week but even if you’re not local, you’re going to find cool stuff every time you go.

Space Oddity, custom t-shirts, beakers

Space Oddity is definitely NOT a pretentious place, it’s quite humble and Todd isn’t interested in gouging customers for top dollar collectible items.  Everything is priced properly and often you’ll find something very useful at a bargain price.  We have certainly found a number of things at Todd’s shop, we’ve purchased things for our home, for our office and fixtures at the shop.  Just another reason we love living in Ballard, good people, great places, great finds.

Space Oddity, mobile

 

Space Oddity, file cabinets

 Want to see more cool places in Ballard? Follow our Pinterest board “Free Ballard” here